NIH: Clarification of K99 – 4 year Limit of Postdoctoral Research Eligibility

Part 2. Section III. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants

Currently reads:

Eligible Individuals (Program Director/Principal Investigator)

K99 applicants must have no more than 4 years of postdoctoral research experience at the time of the initial or the subsequent resubmission or revision application, and must be in mentored, postdoctoral training positions to be eligible to apply to the K99/R00 program. If an applicant achieves independence (i.e., any faculty or non-mentored research position) before a K99 award is made, neither the K99 award, nor the R00 award, will be issued.

Modified to read:

Eligible Individuals (Program Director/Principal Investigator)

K99 applicants must have no more than 4 years of postdoctoral research experience at the time of the initial or the subsequent resubmission or revision application, and must be in mentored, postdoctoral training positions to be eligible to apply to the K99/R00 program. If an applicant achieves independence (i.e., any faculty or non-mentored research position) before a K99 award is made, neither the K99 award, nor the R00 award, will be issued.

Parental leave or other well-justified leave for pressing personal or family situations of generally less than 12 months duration (e.g., family care responsibilities, disability or illness, active military duty) is not included in the 4-year eligibility limit. In addition, time spent conducting postgraduate clinical training that does not involve research is not considered as part of the 4-year research training eligibility limit. Only time dedicated to research activities would count toward the 4-year limit.

Additional clarifications are provided under Frequently Asked Questions. Potential candidates are encouraged to discuss their individual situation with an NIH Institute or Center Scientific Program Contact before applying.

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to:

Henry Khachaturian, Ph.D.
Acting NIH Research Training Officer
NIH Office of Extramural Programs
Telephone: 301-451-4225
Email: NIHTrain@mail.nih.gov

– See more at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-15-013.html

2014-15 Medical Imaging Conferences Schedule

2014-15 Medical Imaging Conferences Schedule

Ordered by Deadline Date

Deadline Conference Location Dates Link
Aug 8th, 2014 SPIE Orlando Feb 21st – 26th, 2015 LINK
Nov 10th, 2014 ISBI New York City Apr 16th – 19th, 2015 LINK
Nov 12th, 2014 ISMRM Toronto May 30th – Jun 5th, 2015 LINK
Dec 11th/18th, 2015 IPMI Scotland Jun 28th – Jul 3rd, 2015 LINK
Dec 12th, 2015 SOBP Toronto May 14th – 16th, 2015 LINK
Jan 15th, 2015 OHBM Honolulu Jun 14th – 18th, 2015 LINK
Mar 6th, 2015 MICCAI Munich Oct 5th – 9th, 2015 LINK

Breakthrough Brain Model

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The powerhouse team of Drs. Sharmishtaa Seshamani, PhD and Anna Blazejewska, PhD has created the first functioning chocolate-based model of the human central nervous system. “ The number of neuronal connections in this artificial system is yet unknown but we predict that it will be a game changer in chocolate artificial nervous systems.” Sinchai Tsao another fellow in their research group commented “…the unique combination of white chocolate (for white matter) and dark chocolate (for grey matter) was ingenious …” Another unique feature of this system is that it lends itself especially well for TBI (traumatic brain injury) research because of the inclusion of raspberry jam (not to be confused with raspberry pi – a computing system) as a model fluid for blood. Mengyuan Liu, another researcher group is an expert in neonatal Intra-Ventricular Hemorrhage (IVH) is interested in applying to simulated IVHs in neonates. Future improvements include improve modulation of sugar content in the WM layer as well as possible changes in the composition of the GM center. In summary, we really don’t know what to expect next from this chocolate-laden research but we eagerly await the next iteration of their ground-breaking model system.

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CHLA Video with my advisor Natasha Lepore PhD, featuring my chubby hands and random shots of my face

Just saw this on Children’s Hospital Los Angeles’ YouTube Channel. I was there for this shoot for Natasha. Super proud to be part of her group. More importantly it features my chubby typing hands LOL. It also gives a flavor of the kind of awesome work that is part of our field.

The video reminds me how I got into working on Neonatal MRI from working on Dementia and AD – Thanks to Natasha and Vidya!

 

Joined BICG @ University of Washington

I’m happy to announce that as of Dec 3, 2013, I’ve joined University of Washington’s Biomedical Image Computing Group as Senior Fellow under the direction of Professor Colin Studholme PhD. I am honored to be part of this amazing lab that has done some inspiring work ever since it was formed at UCSF and now relocated to UW. For more information about the lab, you can take a look at it’s website here: BICG

I hope to wrap up my work on Alzheimers Disease and move on to work on the development of more challenging image analysis techniques with the Neonates / Fetal population that BICG work with. Exciting times!!